What Kind of Plant ATE this mouse?


Plants can make wonderful decorations to the landscape, nature, and the home. But, what happens when the beautiful green plants turn carnivorous? Zero2Hero presents an informative view of plants, such as the basic Venus Fly Trap and the cephalotus (Australian pitcher plant), to plants that eat entire birds!


Transcript Provided by YouTube:

00:00
just as in the story of Hansel and Gretel where a wicked witch built a
00:04
house from a tasty gingerbread to lure children to their death so do some
00:08
plants and trees use their sweet sticky fruit to lure insects into theirs but
00:13
unlike the tales by the Brothers Grimm this is far from fantasy carnivorous
00:18
plants have been around far longer than we have the oldest carnivorous plant
00:22
leaf fossil was found in 35 to 47 million year old amber that was found in
00:28
the Baltic regions stay tuned to find out which of these plants is cunning
00:33
enough to bring Birds to their gruesome death
00:47
number 10 the Venus flytrap probably the best known of the carnivorous plants is
00:54
the Venus flytrap it’s commonly found in homes as a functional house plant after
00:59
all no one wants a kitchen filled with flies originally the Venus flytrap is
01:04
from the boggy lands of North and South Carolina they developed their cunning
01:08
feeding methods as a means of gaining much-needed nutrients because as the
01:12
soil quality is so poor it is unable to sustain much complex life they feed by
01:18
snapping shut the two halves of their leaves when an insect lands on them
01:22
trapping their unfortunate prey inside their finger like thorns intertwine
01:27
making any bid for escape futile they are not unscrupulous though they don’t
01:32
just snap at every passing fly they only choose to close when the fly itself
01:37
tells them to do so that’s right when they touch the to
01:41
trigger hairs on the inside of the open leaf triggering a deadly reaction but
01:46
recent researches found it’s even creepier than that
01:49
professor Renier Hedrick from the University of würzburg when talking
01:53
about becoming caught inside of the flytrap says if you just sit there and
01:57
wait the next morning the trap will open and you can leave but if you panic you
02:02
induce a deadly cycle of disintegration this is because venus flytraps can
02:07
actually count one touch of the hairs and nothing happens two touches and the
02:13
trap Springs closed in a tenth of a second three touches and the plant
02:17
starts producing its digestive juices the fifth touch then releases the
02:22
plant’s digestive enzymes into the leaf and the more touches the trigger hairs
02:26
receive the more enzymes are produced so the more a fly bites to escape the more
02:33
it’s telling the plant to eat it alive I think I knew a girl like that once
02:39
number nine the sundews or drosera also known as this drosera mr. Charles Darwin
02:46
once said about the sundews it’s a wonderful plant or rather a most
02:50
sagacious animal I will stick up for drosera to the day of my death perhaps
02:55
I’m not as profound as Darwin however I do think that they are one of the
03:00
your species their long leaves are covered in sticky tentacles making it
03:04
look like it should live at the bottom of the ocean but in actuality they can
03:08
be found in one form or another all over the world their tentacles all contain
03:13
nectar glands that produce a sticky droplet of digestive enzymes of their
03:17
tips which gleam in the light giving them the name sundews some sundew plants
03:22
have long slender leaves and others have bowl-like leaves but whatever they look
03:27
like they all act in the same way lured to the plant by its sweet scent
03:31
insects soon become stuck in the tacky do causing them to struggle this motion
03:36
causes the leaf to curl around the insect wrapping it tightly in its leaves
03:40
now unlike the Venus flytrap these insects are not eaten alive but rather
03:46
they drown in the sticky dew and then they’re broken down by the plants the
03:50
just of enzymes number 8 the North American pitcher plant I know what
03:56
you’re thinking but no this plan has nothing to do with pitchers of beer the
04:01
term pitcher refers to its leaves which have evolved into large lidded funnels
04:06
perfect for the trapping of unsuspecting prey the north american pitcher plant
04:11
can be found along the east coast throughout Texas the Great Lakes and
04:15
southeastern Canada unlike the Venus flytrap in the sundews
04:19
pitcher plants don’t grasp their prey but rather trap them in an inescapable
04:24
prism by means of a pitfall trap insects and other unfortunate small creatures
04:29
are drawn to the lip of the pitchers by the smell fits nectar or the bright
04:33
colors of the leaves but are then met with slippery waxy deposits causing them
04:38
to drop into the liquid reservoir of the digestive enzymes in the base of the
04:42
funnel one species of pitcher takes it even further to guarantee a meal and
04:46
laces its nectar with Komine an insect narcotic once the prey is inside it
04:52
quickly becomes apparent that there is no way out
04:55
waxy walls make climbing difficult and closer to the bottom hairs grow
04:59
downwards making any bit for freedom impossible finally one spray hits the
05:04
liquid they are quickly drown and slowly digested by the plant number seven
05:11
monkey cups a cute little name for a slightly
05:15
sinister plant right found from the tropics of China all the way down to
05:20
Australia monkey cups are species of tropical pitcher plant specializing in
05:24
pitfall traps they get their cute name because on occasion monkeys have been
05:29
observed drinking rainwater from them unlike the North American pitchers who
05:33
grow in the ground monkey cups are creepers using the trees
05:37
and the force to climb high into the canopies their pitchers then form on the
05:41
end of hanging tendrils attracting insects with the sweet scent of pollen
05:45
these traps work in much the same ways other pitchers they are too slippery to
05:50
climb out of and so insects drown in the fluid inside the movement of the
05:54
drowning insect then stimulates the plant to release its digestive fluid a
05:58
fluid so powerful that a midge will completely dissolve in just hours the
06:03
majority of these pitchers will catch only small prey but the Nepenthes Rajah
06:08
has also been known to even digest mice in some cases these pictures even enlist
06:13
the help of other insects one plan provides a chamber in its stem allowing
06:18
ants to live in it and to eat some of the decaying prey the ant sits at the
06:22
top of the pitcher and eats and as it does smaller pieces of its food drop
06:27
back into the digestive liquid and can now be dissolved more quickly than a
06:31
whole insect would number 6 the Cobra Lily the Cobra Lily
06:37
also known as the California pitcher plant is the sole member of its genus
06:41
and unsurprisingly can be found in California and Oregon growing only in
06:46
bogs in pine forests or other areas of poor soil quality it’s called the Cobra
06:51
Lily because of the shape of its leaves large bulbous and curling over they seem
06:56
to resemble a Cobra preparing to strike complete with dangling leaves that look
07:00
like a snakes or tongue this pitcher plan is a little different from the
07:05
others and does not use a pitfall trap but rather a lobster pod trap meaning
07:10
it’s easy to get in but impossible to get out of
07:13
once inside drawn in again by the smell of something tasty downwards pointing
07:18
hairs lead insects towards the gathered liquid at the base of the pitcher where
07:22
they then drown unlike the other pitcher plans Cobra
07:26
these do not seem to excrete their own digestive enzymes but rather rely on
07:30
bacteria to break their prey down for them
07:33
number five bladderworts spread across every continent except Antarctica
07:40
bladderworts are made up of over 220 species both terrestrial and aquatic
07:46
these plants don’t rely on the scent of their nectar to attract prey though but
07:49
rather they lay in wait ready to spring their traps as soon as their prey moves
07:54
close enough the majority of animals eaten by bladderworts are microscopic
07:58
protozoa but the larger specimens of this carnivorous plan have been known to
08:02
take water fleas and even small tadpoles the plant’s bladder chambers sit in the
08:08
water on the outside of the leaf there are small hairs as these hairs are
08:12
grazed by passing animals they trigger a reaction a trapdoor opens up the water
08:18
and the unfortunate animal are sucked inside the bladder and it quickly closes
08:23
leaving the prey trapped inside believe it or not it does all of this within a
08:27
ten thousandth of a second pretty impressive for such a small plant number
08:33
for rainbow plants the rainbow plant is native to the dry deserts of Australia
08:39
although growing separately from other carnivorous plants evolution has devised
08:43
a similar solution to that of the sub news for dealing with a lack of
08:47
nutrients glands that produce a sticky trap
08:50
it’s these globules of digestive enzymes shining in the Sun that has given the
08:54
rainbow plant its name their leaves and stems are all covered in fine hairs that
08:59
secrete their sticky traps however they are a passive plant acting more like a
09:04
living flypaper trap as the insects hit them they do not curl around the insects
09:08
but instead the insects are digested right where they lay number three the
09:15
water will plant closely related to the Venus flytrap the
09:19
water will plant is a free-floating carnivorous plant catching and eating
09:23
small invertebrate in much the same ways that Venus flytrap it consists of two
09:28
lobes containing trigger hairs once these are triggered they fire the snap
09:32
trap this closes underwater in just 10 milliseconds making it one of the
09:38
fastest moving plants on the planet number 2 butterworts now don’t let the
09:45
name fool you butterworts do not operate in the same way as bladderworts but
09:50
instead are more similar in style to the rainbow plant operating is a simple
09:54
flypaper trap found throughout North and South America Europe and Asia these are
10:00
a quite common plant this succulent plant has leaves that are a bright green
10:03
or pinkish shade these colorful leaves contain two types of cells one that
10:08
produces sticky mucus and the other that produces the plant’s digestive enzymes
10:12
trapping and eating its prey where it lies number one bird catcher trees yes
10:20
you heard that right but don’t get too excited it’s not
10:24
simply a gigantic flytrap big enough to catch a bird it’s a little more sinister
10:29
than that as these trees actually use live bait native to New Zealand and the
10:34
Pacific items these trees are able to catch and kill birds after they have
10:39
flower to the spring their seed heads change color usually turning black and
10:43
start to produce a thick sticky glue this glue in turn traps passing insects
10:48
but wait didn’t they say this was a bird catching tree why yes I did
10:53
so these trapped in struggling little insects now look like an easy meal to
10:58
the birds in the area that in turn land unknowingly on the deadly tree
11:02
these birds soon become covered in the sticky substance themselves and will
11:06
either get stuck to the tree or will fall to the floor as the glue in their
11:10
wings makes it impossible to fly if other passing hunters do not take these
11:14
disabled birds they will slowly die their bodies then break down into the
11:19
soil around the roots of the trees providing a nutrient-rich soil for them
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to flourish can you tell us about your favorite carnivorous plant let us know
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in the comments below and clickety-click that
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you


This post was previously published on YouTube.

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