Removing the Stigma Surrounding Men and Mental Health

More than 75% of suicides are male, despite women attempting suicide three to four times more often than men. These days, the need to redesign the stigma and turn it into a positive response to mental health is more prominent than ever.

We live in a modern world where we are (thankfully, and at long last) finally prioritizing health more and more. For years now – and especially in recent years – physical health has become more and more of a top priority. This is largely thanks to advancements in awareness and in-depth understanding of all things physical health. And the advancements keep on coming. If you injure your eye, for example, a single appointment with a specialist or a trip to the emergency room can quickly diagnose the problem and give you the appropriate course of treatment.

When you experience intense headaches or back pain, finding applicable solutions is easier than ever. While this incredible dedication towards understanding physical health is necessary and inspiring on equal counts, it begs the question of why other aspects of overall health are not given the same attention to detail. Every aspect of overall health is incredibly important in its own way – this much is undeniable. So why is physical health so far ahead in terms of acknowledgment, recognition, understanding, and ongoing research and medical advancements? Take mental health, for example.

Redesigning the stigma surrounding mental health

Mental health is one of the most crucial aspects of overall health. In fact, many would argue that it is the single most important aspect of overall health there is. The percentage of individuals directly impacted by mental health struggles continues to rise year after year, and yet we are still in a place where the stigma surrounding mental health outweighs the necessity to change our approach. This is especially true when it comes to males being impacted by their struggles with mental health.

In fact, more than 75% of suicides are male, despite women attempting suicide three to four times more often than men. These days, the need to redesign the stigma and turn it into a positive response to mental health is more prominent than ever. And it all starts with mindset – the way that you approach mental health from the onset has a distinct and ongoing impact on the way that mental health continues to be addressed moving forward.

Opening more supportive ways of assisting those struggling

While women obviously struggle with their mental health just as much as men do, it is men that struggle more with understanding and responding appropriately to their struggles. Men have long lived with the unhealthy stereotype that they must be tough and strong, not letting anything get them down. The whole “men don’t cry” approach is outdated, but the fact that the world still largely adopts this misconception (even if half-heartedly) is proof that there is still a very long way to go when it comes to addressing men and their relationship with their own mental health.

Creating a more positive future perspective for men’s mental health

While of course, women’s mental health is incredibly important as well, the additional barriers that men must overcome thanks to societal pressure are largely responsible for the heightened negative attitude and misunderstanding towards men and their struggles with their own mental health. We must actively and consistently work towards giving men (and women, for that matter) a more honest, open, and supportive world to ask for help when they need it. Mental health is too important, and lives are literally on the line.

This content is sponsored by Annabel Monaghan.

Photo: Shutterstock

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